Accommodations

 

Academic accommodations and services are individualized and developed on a case-by-case basis. Specific accommodations are determined by an intake with a Disability Services Specialist and a student's documentation. Academic accommodations will be reasonable and appropriate based on a student's disability. Academic accommodations do not include services or equipment of a personal nature.

During an intake, students meet with a Disability Services Specialist to discuss their strengths, academic concerns, past experiences, and impacts of disability. An intake is a conversation to discuss what worked or did not work in the past as well as developing new resources and strategies for the college environment. Documentation provides the Disability Services Specialist with an understanding of an individual's disability and information to anticipate the current impact of the disability and how it interacts with the college environment.

The DisAbility Specialist takes into consideration the information shared during intake along with documentation when developing an accommodation plan.

The Disability Services Specialist takes into consideration the information shared during intake along with documentation when developing a plan for services and accommodations.

The following are examples of frequently used accommodations. This list is not exhaustive and all accommodations are determined on a case-by-case basis. If you do not see an accommodation listed, it may still be offered. Conversely, just because an accommodation is listed does not mean that all students are eligible to receive that accommodation.

 

DisAbility Services

The Learning Center
Prahl College Center,
PCC2280


Contact Us:
Phone:(810) 232-9181 v/tty
Email: disability@mcc.edu

 

 

Testing Accommodations

Students who are eligible for testing accommodations such as extended time, reader, scribe, or use of adaptive equipment or technology take tests in The Learning Center. Students that only require extended time take tests in the Testing Center.

Extended time is 150% the time given to students taking the test in class. For example, a 1-hour exam in class is extended to 1.5 hours. A 2-hour exam in class is extended to 3 hours.

Learning Center
In order to consistently administer tests, starting Winter 2013/3, the return process for completed tests in the Learning Center will be aligning with that of the Testing Center. The Learning Center will no longer be returning tests using student employees. In light of FERPA and test content security, only college employees will be allowed to pick up tests - this means faculty or their staff designee. Test times must be scheduled ahead of time due to limited testing space and scheduling of scribes and readers. Tests can be scheduled by contacting DisAbility Services at (810) 232-9181 or stopping by the Learning Center. Students are responsible for making this appointment. Instructors submit tests through the Secure Site at secure.mcc.edu. Please ensure you select Learning Center for the test location. Students should never transport their own tests to or from the Learning Center.

Testing Center
Instructors submit tests electronically through https://secure.mcc.edu, entering their username and password, and selecting Testing Center Submission. Tests are only accepted through the secure site.

 

Note Taking

Disabilities Services provides NCR (No Carbon Required) paper to students with this accommodation free of charge for note taking. Students receiving note taking accommodations have a documented disability that interferes with the individual's ability to take notes in class. Instructors have the responsibility of assisting the student in finding a volunteer note taker from the class. It is recommended that the student speak to their instructor about confidentiality before the instructor makes an announcement.

Alternate Format Text

This is an accommodation to receive an alternate (typically electronic) version of a textbook. Students must purchase, provide receipts, and complete an Alternate Format Text Request form to request any textbook in an alternate format. Upon receiving an alternate format text, students may use text to speech assistive technology to read the textbook.

Sign Language Interpreting

Sign language interpreting is available to students with a hearing loss whose preferred mode of communication is American Sign Language (ASL). Interpreters are available to students for all college-related business including but not limited to classes, registration, financial aid, meetings with instructors, counseling/advising, orientation and placement testing. It is helpful if students requesting interpreters make their requests two weeks prior to the date of need to ensure adequate time for scheduling. Last-minute requests will be honored whenever possible. The DisAbility Services Specialist who works with students who use ASL is fluent in ASL and able to provide direct services.

C-Print

C-Print is a service available to students with a hearing loss who prefer to access lecture and classroom information by reading text. "A trained operator, called a C-Print captionist, produces text of the spoken information using a software application called C-Print Pro. The captionist is skilled in text-condensing strategies and in typing using an abbreviation system, which reduces keystrokes. The text can be displayed simultaneously to one or more students in different ways, including additional computers (laptops) or display monitors. The captionist includes as much information as possible, generally providing a meaning-for-meaning (not verbatim) translation of the spoken English content." More information on C-Print can be found at www.ntid.rit.edu/CPRINT.

FM Systems

FM Systems are available to students to check-out from the Learning Center. FM Systems are typically used by students with a hearing loss who need sound amplification. FM systems are composed of a transmitter and a receiver. The instructor wears the transmitter, which looks like a wireless microphone, and lectures normally. Instead of the sound being distributed to the room like through a speaker system, the transmitter connects to a receiver. The student can listen using the receiver using headphones and can adjust the sound volume as needed. Some students have hearing aids that include technology allowing them to directly connect to the transmitter thus eliminating the need for headphones. It is important that if an instructor leads a class discussion and is wearing an FM system that they either pass the transmitter with microphone to students or repeat the questions/comments of students. Otherwise the student using the FM System will not have access to the discussion.

Assistive Technology

MCC offers assistive technology that may benefit students that need to access materials in an alternate way or format. The Learning Center includes a Closed Circuit Television (CCTV), FM Systems, Read&Write Gold, Dragon Naturally Speaking, JAWS, and ZoomText. Contact a DisAbility Specialist to discuss training for any of these programs.