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Other Employment Laws

Bullard-Plawecki Employee Right To Know Act

In general, the Act provides an employee with three rights with respect to his or her personnel records:
  1. the right to review the records upon written request;
  2. the right to a copy of the records; and
  3. the right to file a written response to the records if the employee disagrees with them.
This law also regulates the employer's use and disclosure of certain components of personnel files. At Mott, the request to review the personnel file is made by completing a form in Human Resources and then an appointment is made so the employee can review the file at the HR Office.

Follow this link for Mott's policy on complying with this law: Bullard-Plawecki Personnel Records
MCL 423.501 et seq.

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Enables individuals to obtain public records created by governmental entities by submitting a written request. Employees may usually obtain needed information concerning their employment by making a simple request to their supervisor and would not need to make a formal written FOIA request. In addition, our labor agreements provide union access to records. MCL 15.231, et seq.

Open Meetings Act (OMA)

All meetings of a public body must be open to the public unless an exception specifically permitted by law applies. The Act further also requires proper notification of open and closed meetings and mandates that minutes be kept of all meetings of a public body, whether open or closed. MCL 15.261 et seq.

Public Employment Relations Act (PERA)

This is the Michigan set of labor laws for public sector employees. MCL 423.201 et. seq.

Whistleblower's Protection Act (WPA)

The WPA provides that an employer may not discharge, threaten or otherwise discriminate against an employee with respect to wages, terms, conditions, location or privileges of employment, because the employee reports or is about to report a violation or suspected violation of any state, local, or federal law to a public body. This act also protects employees who participate in hearings, investigations, legislative inquiries, or court cases. MCL 15.362 et seq.

Youth Employment Standards Act (YESA)

This Michigan law applies to all Michigan employers that employ a minor, which is defined as a person under 18 years of age. This act regulates the hours and days of employment for minors under the age of 18 and requires work permits when employing them. Get more information here: Hiring of Minors MCL 409.101 et seq.

Summary of Employment Laws for Employees


June 7, 2016
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