Mott Community College Safe Water Pledge The Aspen Institute Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence Top 150 2021

MCC Coronavirus Information

03/12/2020

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Information

Mott Community College is closely monitoring the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) situation, and is working in conjunction with public health officials and medical professionals to ensure the safety -- and well-being -- of our students, faculty, staff, and visitors.

History & Governmental Information
The virus was first detected in China and has now spread to more than 100 countries, including the United States. This situation is evolving rapidly, and updated information can be found from the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the State of Michigan Department of Health and Human Services at https://www.michigan.gov/Coronavirus or the Genesee County Health Department at https://gchd.us/coronavirus/.

Are Classes and Events Cancelled?

In light of the Governor’s announcement closing all K-12 buildings from Monday, March 16 – Friday, April 5, we will close all Mott Community College sites to the general public from March 14 – Sunday, April 5. Please note that the MCC Board of Trustees meetings and the Board Committee meetings will take place and are open to the public for college business continuity purposes.

There will be no face-to-face classes the weeks of Saturday, March 14 – Sunday, April 5.

Already scheduled online courses will resume on Monday, March 16 as planned.

During the week of March 16 – 22, students, faculty, and staff will prepare for tele-work and tele-learning. Extensive training opportunities will be offered on campus and online for using the new learning management system Canvas, Zoom videoconferencing and other technology products. The dates and times will be listed on the MCC COVID-19 information webpage.

Additionally, the College is cancelling all non-essential events and gatherings regardless of their size (“non-essential events” are those that are not required for the day-to-day business continuity of the College) at this time through the end of April 2020. Events related directly to spring 2020 graduation are still considered to be scheduled (not yet canceled), but are being assessed daily for their feasibility. Please continue to monitor your MCC email and this page for all updates.
Jason Wilson, Vice President of Student Success Services, and Dr. Russell L Bush are leading MCC’s response to this global health concern. Dr. Bush and Vice President Wilson are following CDC guidance for higher education institutions and coordinating with local and state health officials to inform an appropriate course action within this fluid situation.

Where you can get current information:
• Link to landing page on web site
• The MCC4Me Portal and daily “Morning Mail”
• Official college email system
• MCC on Facebook
• MCC on Twitter
• MCC on Instagram
• MCC Newsroom on the homepage
• Emergency/urgent text alerts through the RAVE system

If you have not signed up for the text alerts, you can do so through the MCC4Me portal/My Mott Apps/Account Manager. Please also follow Mott Community College on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

If You Are Sick – PLEASE STAY HOME!
MCC asks that students and employees who are sick please stay home from class or work in accordance with our board policy [Policy No. 5502 – Communicable Diseases ].

The College will work with faculty and managers to accommodate students and employees who stay home while ill. Students who miss instructional time should contact their faculty for assistance. Any student missing extended periods of instruction should contact the Assistant Vice President of Student Success Services for guidance at jason.wilson@mcc.edu .

What About Travel Abroad and MCC-sponsored Travel to Conferences?
International travel on behalf of the College has been suspended until the end of April. Travel on behalf of the College within the United States is restricted to essential travel only. Employees must check with their supervisor to determine if travel is essential or not.

MCC is asking employees who have traveled to a Level 2 or Level 3 Notice country within the past 14 days (Japan, China, South Korea, Iran, and Italy) to self-report to their Executive Cabinet member, and to self-quarantine for a recommended period of 14 days consistent with CDC and State of Michigan guidelines.

MCC is also asking students who have traveled to a Level 2 or Level 3 Notice country within the past 14 days (Japan, China, South Korea, Iran, and Italy) to self-report to Jason Wilson, Vice President for Student Success Services, and to self-quarantine for a recommended period of 14 days consistent with CDC and State of Michigan guidelines.

Additionally, if you have an immediate family member who has traveled to any of the Level 3 or Level 2 countries listed by the CDC here, please self-report to your supervisor or instructor to determine the best course of action, which may include self-quarantine. If you plan personal travel to a Level 2 or Level 3, or to a state that has declared a state of emergency related to COVID-19, you are asked to self-report this travel to your supervisor or instructor in order to coordinate any impact.

What is Coronavirus COVID-19?
COVID-19 is a newly identified coronavirus that is causing an outbreak of pneumonia illness. It was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, human coronaviruses are common throughout the world and usually cause mild to moderate illness in people. This new virus is a public health concern because:
• It is newly identified, so much is still unknown about it.
• Two other human coronaviruses, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, have caused severe illness.
• No vaccine currently exists.

Am I at risk of contracting COVID-19?
The CDC considers COVID-19 a public health concern based on current information. However, the immediate health risk to the general U.S. public is considered low at this time. The CDC has identified the following individuals as at higher risk for serious illness with COVID-19:
• Older adults.
• People who have serious chronic or underlying medical conditions such as:
o Heart disease.
o Diabetes.
o Lung disease.

If you have traveled recently to a CDC-identified Level 2 or Level 3 country, or to a state that has declared a state of emergency related to COVID-19 you may be at risk. Visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/index.html for up-to-date information on geographic risk assessment.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms may be flu-like, ranging from mild to serious, and include:
• Fever.
• Cough.
• Difficulty breathing.

Person-to-person spread is occurring, although it is unclear exactly how COVID-19 is being transmitted and how easily the virus spreads between people. Current thinking is that it is easily spread, mostly by droplet form in exhaled breath vapor, sneezing, and coughing; it can survive on surfaces for varying periods of time; it can also be spread by those who are not yet sick.

How can I prevent getting COVID-19?
There is no vaccine to prevent this virus, and the CDC advises that the best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to COVID-19.

Here are everyday actions to help prevent the spread of all respiratory viruses:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Stay home when you are sick.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces
• Consider alternatives to shaking hands.
• Unless you are sick with cough, sneezing and fever, it is not advised to wear a mask.

Visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention web site at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/index.html for more detailed information.

What should I do if I think I have been exposed to COVID-19?
If you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, contact your healthcare provider and self-isolate. The CDC offers the following guidance on how to self-isolate: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/steps-when-sick.html

Additionally, if you or a household member believe you have been exposed to anyone who has traveled to any of the countries listed above (Japan, China, South Korea, Iran, and Italy), you should self-report to your Executive Cabinet member (for employees) or VPSSS Jason Wilson (for students) to determine the best course of action, which may include self-quarantine.

What is does it mean to self-quarantine or self-isolate?
Isolation and quarantine help protect the public by preventing exposure to people who have or may have a contagious disease.

Isolation separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick.

Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick.

Should I self-quarantine, self-isolate, self-monitor or self-observation?
CDC recommends anyone returning from countries with a CDC Level 2 or Level 3 Travel Warning self-quarantine for 14 days from your last day in that country. The self-quarantine recommendation currently does not apply in general to travelers who only transit through an airport in one of these countries. Self-monitor for the development of any symptoms, and call your healthcare provider right away if you develop symptoms.

Those returning from domestic travel in areas with sustained community transmission of COVID-19 are encouraged to practice self-observation for the development of any symptoms, and call your healthcare provider right away if you develop a fever or respiratory symptoms.

Again, symptoms may be flu-like, ranging from mild to serious, and include:
• Fever.
• Cough.
• Difficulty breathing.

How do I self-quarantine?
CDC recommends anyone returning from countries with a CDC Level 3 Travel Warning self-quarantine for 14 days from your last day in that country. The self-quarantine recommendation currently does not apply in general to travelers who only transit through an airport in one of these countries.

To self-quarantine, you should:
• Stay home. Do not go to work, school or public areas.
• Separate yourself from other people in your home. Avoid visitors to your home.
• Self-monitor for fever by checking temperature at least twice a day. Contact your healthcare provider if you develop a fever or respiratory symptoms.
• When seeking medical care, call ahead and tell them about your symptoms before heading to the doctor’s office or the emergency room.
• Do not use public transport like buses or taxis.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, and immediately throw the tissue in the trash and clean hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer (if soap and water are not available).
• Clean and disinfect frequently used objects and surfaces.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

Online resources:
National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),

State of Michigan Department of Health & Human Services -https://www.michigan.gov/Coronavirus

Genesee County Health Department - https://gchd.us/coronavirus/.

Preventing COVID-19 - https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/index.html

Video resources from the CDC - https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/communication/videos.html

What to stock up on for COVID-19 - https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/money/2020/03/04/coronavirus-what-stock-up-and-how-prepare-your-emergency-kit/4937518002/


Mott Community College is committed to excellence in education and offering services that cultivate student success and improve the overall quality of life in a multicultural community. With more than 100 academic and occupational degree programs, we help students prepare to achieve more in an ever-changing economy. Through university transfer agreements, high-demand associate's degree programs and one-year certification programs, we help ensure that all Mott students are ready to get more out of life.

As an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution, the College encourages diversity and provides equal opportunity in education, employment, all of its programs, and the use of its facilities. The College does not discriminate in educational or employment opportunities or practices on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, gender, gender expression, gender identity, national origin, veteran’s status, age, disability unrelated to an individual’s ability to perform adequately, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic protected by law. Title IX Coordinator Contact Information: 1401 E. Court St.,Prahl College Center – Student Success Services Center (PCC-2280E), Flint, MI 48503, (810) 762-0024. Title II, ADA, Coordinator Contact Information: 1401 E. Court St., Curtice-Mott Complex (CM-1117), Flint, MI 48503 (810) 762-0373. Section 504 Coordinator Contact Information: 1401 E. Court St., Prahl College Center (PCC-2280A), Flint, MI 48503 (810) 762-0191.For important information about the educational debt, earnings, and completion rates of students who attended these programs, please see the following link: https://www.mcc.edu/gainful_employ_disclosure/index.php Mott Community College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (hlcommission.org), a regional accreditation agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

###


March 13, 2020
Mott Tree Logo