Mott Community College Safe Water Pledge The Aspen Institute Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence Top 150 2019

Drug Free Environment and Prevention


Mott Community College is committed to providing a campus environment free of the abuse and illegal use of alcohol and other drugs.


Mott Community College is committed to complying with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) through its Alcohol and Other Drug Program (AOD). Under federal legislation, entitled The Drug Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA), Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) such as Mott Community College (MCC), must certify it has implemented programs to prevent the abuse of alcohol and use, and/or distribution of illicit drugs. These regulations apply to MCC students, faculty and staff both on its premises and as a part of any of its activities. No institution of higher education shall be eligible to receive funds or any other form of financial assistance under any federal program unless they oblige by these regulations.

MISSION, GOALS & COMMITMENT

Mott Community College (MCC) will implement a comprehensive alcohol and other drugs prevention program that directly affects those within the campus community.

The mission of the Alcohol and Other Drugs programming is to raise awareness, educate and train MCC students, faculty and staff to prevent the abuse of alcohol and use, and/or distribution of illicit drugs.

The goals within the Alcohol and Other Drugs prevention program will be evidence-based and include prevention, early intervention, and treatment services that will adequately decrease the severity and frequency of alcohol and drug use that can interference with a safe learning environment and supports student and employee health, wellness and success.

MCC is committed to providing information, resources and a training platform to raise awareness and educate our college community on topics included in the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) as well as other health and wellness resources.

ANNUAL NOTIFICATION

At a minimum, MCC will annually distribute the following in writing to all students and employees:

  • Standards of conduct that clearly prohibit the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees;
  • A description of the legal sanctions under federal, state, or local law for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol;
  • A description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and alcohol abuse;
  • A description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or reentry programs that are available to employees or students; and
  • A clear statement that the institution will impose sanctions on students and employees and a description of those sanctions, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution, for violations of the standards of conduct or law.

BIENNIAL REVIEW

MCC will utilize an interdisciplinary team to identify and manage AOD related environmental risk factors that impede student / employee success, interfere with institutional priorities and increase the college's liability.

The biennial review is conducted in a way that meets the compliance guidelines set forth by the regulations with the goal to strengthen MCC’s prevention efforts. The format of the review should clearly reflect the compliance guidelines.

Requirements of the biennial review has two objectives outlined in the regulation:

  1. To determine the effectiveness of, and to implement any needed changes to, the AOD prevention program
  2. To ensure that campuses enforce the disciplinary sanctions for violating standards of conduct consistently

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS (AOD) PROGRAM

MCC has instituted several AOD initiatives, including but not limited to:

  • DAPP’s online training for students; workshops designed to support students with alcohol and substance abuse challenges;
  • College activities focused on the health risks of alcohol and drugs;
  • Campaigns to raise awareness of available resources, addressing myth’s and stigma’s associated with seeking support, and education of personal safety and bystander techniques.

The DAPP’s online training is designed to raise awareness, educate and train MCC students on the effects of alcohol and illicit drug abuse. The DAPP’s training is developed to meet the minimum requirements of the drug-free Schools and Campuses Regulations, while also providing resources, tips and the impact on student success.

The goals of the DAPP’s online training include:

  • Implement and manage an evidence-based prevention programs that will support MCC students, faculty, staff, and the communities within the service area, including the Greater Flint Area.
  • Provide current and Researched treatment centers, counseling, rehabilitation, or leave of absence/ re-entry programs available to those impacted by alcohol and illicit drug abuse.
  • Adopt measurable (both quantitative and qualitative) objectives that shape improvements to the AOD activities.

Mott Community College prohibits the unlawful use, possession, sale, distribution, or manufacture of controlled substances or alcohol on college property or as part of activities. MCC neither permits nor condones the possession, use, or sale of illegal drugs and narcotics.

Students:

MCC will impose sanctions for violation of policies and procedures consistent with federal and state law and with applicable Student Code of Conduct provisions and college policies. Violations may result in disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from college, and referral for prosecution. Sanctions imposed will depend upon the severity and frequency of the violation. In addition to, or in lieu of, discipline, violators may be required to complete an appropriate rehabilitation program. Information about rehabilitation programs is available in the MCC Academic Advisement Center (Prahl College Center PCC 2040) and discussing these options with a Licensed Professional Counselor.

Employees:

According to the Drug Free Workplace/Controlled Substances Board Policy 5801: being under the influence of a controlled substance while at work and/or the use, possession, distribution, purchase, sale, dispensation and/or manufacturing of controlled substances, as defined by federal and state law, by College employees on College grounds, in College buildings or vehicles and/or in connection with any College activity, is prohibited. Violations of federal, state, or local law or board policy may result in referral for prosecution, or disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from the college.

The full version of the current Drug Free Workplace/Controlled Substances can be found on: Board Policy 5801.

The Mott Community College Public Safety Department enforces all federal and state laws and local ordinances. The Drug and Alcohol Policy defines substances as alcohol of any form, controlled or illegal drugs or substances (including hallucinogens, barbiturates, depressants, stimulants, cannabinoids, opioids, club drugs, dissociative drugs and any other compounds or drugs whose use, possession, or transfer is restricted or prohibited by law), any substance that influences a person in a way that jeopardizes the safety of person or other persons or hinders the person’s ability or any other person’s ability to perform work responsibilities

The College falls within federal and state Drug-Free School Zone laws.

Violations of drug and alcohol laws will be reported under the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act as well as Michigan law.

By federal law, students convicted of drug offenses committed while receiving Title IV federal financial aid may be in-eligible for aid for one or more years from the date of conviction. For additional information, visit the Financial Assistance website.

Federal

Please be advised that this is not intended to be an all inclusive list and is subject to change. Relevant and up-to-date information can be found at:

FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES
DRUG/SCHEDULE QUANTITY PENALTIES QUANTITY PENALTIES
Cocaine (Schedule II) 500-4999 grams mixture First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
5 kgs or more mixture First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.

2 or More Prior Offenses: Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Cocaine Base (Schedule II) 28-279 grams mixture 280 grams or more mixture
Fentanyl (Schedule II) 40-399 grams mixture 400 grams or more mixture
Fentanyl Analogue (Schedule I) 10-99 grams mixture 100 grams or more mixture
Heroin (Schedule I) 100-999 grams mixture 1 kg or more mixture
LSD (Schedule I) 1-9 grams mixture 10 grams or more mixture
Methamphetamine (Schedule II) 5-49 grams pure or 50-499 grams mixture 50 grams or more pure or 500 grams or more mixture
PCP (Schedule II) 10-99 grams pure or 100-999 grams mixture 100 gm or more pure or 1 kg or more mixture
DRUG/SCHEDULE QUANTITY PENALTIES
Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid) Any amount First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.
Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV) 1 gram
Other Schedule III drugs Any amount First Offense: Not more than 10 years. If death or serious injury, not more than 15 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 yrs. Fine note more than $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.
All other Schedule IV drugs Any amount First Offense: Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.
Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV) Other than 1 gram or more
All Schedule V drugs Any amount First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 4 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual.
FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES—MARIJUANA
DRUG QUANTITY 1st OFFENSE 2nd OFFENSE *
Marijuana (Schedule I) 1,000 kg or more marijuana mixture; or 1,000 or more marijuana plants Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine not more that $10 million if an individual, $50 million if other than an individual. Not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I) 100 kg to 999 kg marijuana mixture; or 100 to 999 marijuana plants Not less than 5 yrs. or more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if other than an individual. Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I) More than 10 kgs hashish; 50 to 99 kg marijuana mixture

More than 1 kg of hashish oil; 50 to 99 marijuana plants
Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine of $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual. Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I) Less than 50 kilograms marijuana (but does not include 50 or more marijuana plants regardless of weight)

1 to 49 marijuana plants;
Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million if other than an individual. Not more than 10 yrs. Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than individual.
Hashish (Schedule I) 10 kg or less
Hashish Oil (Schedule I) 1 kg or less

State

Please be advised that this is not intended to be an all inclusive list and is subject to change. Relevant and up-to-date information can be found at:

STATE OF MICHIGAN – POSSIBLE LEGAL SANCTIONS
VIOLATION SUMMARY OF VIOLATION POSSIBLE PENALTIES
OWI (drunk driving) A person licensed or not, under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or both, driving in a public place. First offense: misdemeanor, not more than 93 days in jail, and/or fine of $100-

$500, and/or community service not more than 360 hours. As part of sentence, court may order suspension and/or restrictions of operator’s license. Vehicle forfeiture or immobilization may also be required. Up to six points may be added to driver record. If the person has a blood alcohol content of 0.17 grams or more, the person is guilty of a felony punishable by not more than 20 years in prison and/or a fine of $2,500-$10,000.
Permitting person under the influence to drive. Allowing intoxicated person to drive in area open to the public Misdemeanor: not more than 93 days in jail, or fine not less than $100 or more than $500, or both; vehicle can be impounded.
Minor possessing or transporting alcohol in motor vehicle. Person under 21 years of age may not possess or transport alcohol in a vehicle. (Does not apply to transport of alcohol by a minor if a person of at least 21 years of age is present inside the motor vehicle.) Misdemeanor: fine of not more than $100, and may be ordered to perform community service and undergo substance abuse screening and assessment at own expense; vehicle can be impounded for up to 30 days. License sanctions may also be imposed.
Operating while visibly impaired (OWVI) A person driving in areas open to public while impaired from alcohol, drugs, or both. First offense: community service for not more than 360 hours; and/or imprisonment for not more than 93 days; and/or a fine of not more than $300. May be required to immobilize vehicle. Restrictions on driver license may also be imposed.
Operating with any presence of a Schedule I drug (OWPD) of A person driving in areas open to the public with any amount of a schedule I or other designated controlled substance in the body. One or more of: community service for not more than 360 hours; imprisonment for not more than 93 days; or a fine of not less than $100 or more than $500. The vehicle may be ordered immobilized.
OWI causing death of another person A person driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance causes the death of another person. Felony: Imprisonment of not more than 15 years, a fine of $2,500-$10,000, or both. Vehicle may be forfeited or immobilized.
OWI causing serious impairment A person driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance causes a serious impairment of a body function of another person. Felony: Imprisonment for not more than 5 years, a fine of $1,000-$5,000, or both. Vehicle may be forfeited or immobilized.
Using false ID to purchase alcohol A minor shall not use fraudulent identification to purchase alcohol, nor shall another individual furnish fraudulent identification to a minor. Imprisonment for not more than 93 days, a fine of not more than $100, or both.
Selling or furnishing alcohol to a minor Alcohol shall not be sold or furnished to a minor. First offense: a fine of not more than $1,000 and imprisonment for not more than 60 days. Second or subsequent offense: a fine of not more than $2,500 and imprisonment for not more than 90 days. Operator’s or chauffeur’s license may also be suspended. May be ordered to perform community service for any violation.
Purchase/possession/ consumption or attempt to purchase/possess/consume by minor (MIP) Person under 21 years of age may not purchase, possess, or consume alcohol. Misdemeanor: first arrest, a fine of not more than $100, or court-ordered diversion; second arrest, not more than $200, and/or up to 30 days imprisonment if in violation of probation due to preceding violation or for failure to follow court orders regarding preceding violation; third or subsequent violation, fine of not more than $500, and/or up to 60 days imprisonment if in violation of probation due to preceding violation or for failure to follow court orders regarding preceding violation. May be ordered to participate in substance abuse prevention or substance abuse treatment and rehabilitation services. May be ordered to perform community service and undergo substance abuse screening and assessment at own expense.

Licensing sanctions may also be imposed. Refusal to take a breathalyzer test is a civil infraction with a $100 fine.
Consumption on public high- way/open alcohol in vehicle No alcoholic beverage can be consumed on public highways; no alcohol item can be open, un-capped, or seal broken in passenger area of vehicle. Misdemeanor: not more than 90 days in jail, a fine of not more than $500, or both. May be ordered to perform community service and undergo substance abuse screening and assessment at own expense. Licensing sanctions may also be imposed.
Disorderly person (intoxicated) Intoxicated in public place and endangering the safety of another person or of property, or causing a disturbance. Misdemeanor: not more than 90 days in jail, a fine of not more than $500, or both.

Local

Legal Sanctions – Local

Local – The City if Flint ordinances include but are not limited to: consumption in public places, possession and use of alcohol by minors, uncapped liquor in passenger compartments of vehicles, and all substance abuse ordinances. Sanctions could range from a civil infraction with attached fines to probation, rehabilitation, or even imprisonment.

HEALTH AND BEHAVIORAL RISKS OF ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT DRUG ABUSE

The negative physical and mental effects of the use of alcohol and other drugs are well documented. Use of these drugs may cause blackouts, poisoning, overdose and death; physical and psychological dependence; damage to vital organs such as the brain, heart, and liver; inability to learn and remember information; and psychological problems including depression, psychosis, and severe anxiety.

Impaired judgment and coordination resulting from the use of alcohol and other drugs are associated with acquaintance assault and rape; DUI/DWI arrests; falls, drowning and other injuries; contracting sexually-transmitted infections.

The substance abuse of family members and friends may also be of concern to individuals. Patterns of risk-taking behavior and dependency not only interfere in the lives of the abusers, but can also have a negative impact on the affected students' academic work, emotional wellbeing and adjustment to college life.

ALCOHOL

Alcohol abuse is a progressive disorder in which physical dependency can develop.

According to the Addiction Center website (https://www.addictioncenter.com/alcohol/, 2019), Alcohol is a legal, controlled substance that lowers anxiety and inhibitions. It also has a broad range of side effects, from loss of coordination to slurred speech. Not everyone who drinks is an alcoholic, but anyone whose life is negatively affected by alcohol on a consistent basis is considered to have an alcohol use disorder. Alcohol is commonly consumed as a drink in various forms, including beer, wine and hard liquor.

Common health risks from alcohol abuse range from physical, mental and emotional negative outcomes:
Image Retrieved March 18th, 2019 from Anjung Sains Makamal 3 Website

MARIJUANA

According to the Addiction Center (https://www.addictioncenter.com/drugs/marijuana/ , 2019), Marijuana is one of the most commonly abused illicit substances. The main psychoactive ingredient, THC, causes temporary euphoria followed by drowsiness, slowed reaction time and increased appetite.

When an individual uses marijuana, cannabinoid receptors in the brain are activated by a neurotransmitter called Anandamide. THC mimics and blocks the actions natural neurotransmitters like Anandamide, to the point where the body no longer produces sufficient Anandamide on its own. The user’s brain is reprogrammed to need marijuana just to feel normal. When the user stops bringing more THC into the body, they often experience withdrawal symptoms because of the resulting lack of Anandamide. Wanting to quit using marijuana, but being unable to do so, is a strong indication of an addiction.

Common health risks from marijuana use range from physical, mental and emotional negative outcomes:
The negative health effects of marijuana
Get Smart About Drugs Website

Other illicit drugs

According to the Addiction Center (https://www.addictioncenter.com/drugs/illicit-drugs/, 2019), the beginning of an illicit substance abuse disorder is marked by a physical dependence. This can be recognized by a tolerance to and withdrawal symptoms from the drug of abuse. Tolerance occurs when you need more of the substance to get the same effects as when you started. When a tolerance is established, a person may experience withdrawal when they stop using the substance. Withdrawal symptoms are severe and can include heart palpitations and seizures, depending on the type of drug used.

The second part of an abuse disorder involves a psychological dependence on the substance. This is characterized by a subjective feeling that the user needs the drug to feel normal. There is often a desire to stop using the drug, as well as prioritization of its use over social and familial responsibilities.

While a person suffering from an illicit substance abuse disorder recognizes the negative consequences of their drug use, they feel unable to stop on their own. The best way to overcome a dependence on illicit drugs is treatment at an inpatient rehab center.

Below are illicit drugs defined by the Addition Center (https://www.addictioncenter.com, 2019) and links to the associated health risks for each illicit drug classification.

Cocaine

Cocaine is a powerfully addictive stimulant made from the leaves of the South American coca plant, and normally comes in a powder form. Street names for cocaine include blow, bump, coke, and snow. Cocaine is most commonly snorted or injected, and can also be smoked or administered to the skin.

Health Risks: Addiction Center - Cocaine Addiction and Abuse

Crack Cocaine

Crack is the more pure and potent form of cocaine, which typically comes in solid blocks or crystals. Crack cocaine is typically smoked, allowing it to reach the brain more quickly and result in a short-lived – yet intense – high. It is also increasingly commonly injected.

Health Risks: Addiction Center - Crack Cocaine Addiction and Abuse

Ecstasy

Used by many high-schoolers and young adults, ecstasy is considered a party drug or rave drug. Its psychoactive effects include enhanced sensory perception and can cause lowered inhibition. Ecstasy is most commonly taken orally in pill form or dissolved in water, but can also be snorted or injected.

Health Risks: Addiction Center - Ecstasy Addiction and Abuse

Hallucinogens

LSD, PCP, mushrooms and salvia are all examples of psychoactive or mind-altering drugs. While an addiction to this type of drug is less common than other drugs, use and abuse of these substances can cause severe negative side effects.

Health Risks: Addiction Center - Hallucinogens

Heroin

Heroin is an extremely addictive substance that is synthetically derived from the opium poppy plant. It comes in the form of white of brownish powder, or as a black and sticky substance known as “black tar.” Heroin is most commonly injected, though it can also be snorted, smoked, or consumed orally.

Health Risks: Addiction Center - Heroin Addiction and Abuse

Inhalants

Inhalants include household items such as spray paints, markers and cleaning supplies which are inhaled through the mouth or nose in order to achieve a high. Inhaling certain types of these substances can lead to heart failure, resulting in death.

Health Risks: Addiction Center - Inhalant Addiction and Abuse

Ketamine

This substance is medically used as an anesthetic in veterinary practice. When abused, ketamine can cause hallucinations, sedation and confusion.

Health Risks: Addiction Center - Ketamine Addiction and Abuse

Meth

Meth is an extremely dangerous stimulant that can cause users to become instantly addicted. The short-term effects of meth include alertness and euphoria. However, long-term use of meth can lead to problems such as violent behavior, severe dental problems, psychosis, and severe paranoia.

Health Risks: Addiction Center - Meth Addiction and Abuse

The following training, programs, resources, counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, or reentry programs are available to employees and/or students as described below.

Students:
  • MCC Students are provided with the DAPP’s online training.
  • The MCC Counseling Center is staffed with Licensed Professional Counselors who are located in the Prahl College Center (PCC 2040). Students have free access to short term counseling services, resources and referrals to outside agencies when applicable.
  • Students have access to a free and confidential Mental Health Screening survey. Information regarding the Mental Health Screening survey are located here: Mental Health Screening survey
  • In addition to MCC student programs, student athletes are presented with general information during their Orientation about alcohol/drug use, as well as resources if they find themselves challenged with alcohol and illicit drug abuse.
Employees:
  • Annually, employees receive notification of the MCC Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program. Additionally, new employees receive this same notification at the time of their hire. The annual notification includes the standards of conduct, possible legal sanctions and penalties, statements of the health risks associated with alcohol and other drug abuse, the programs available to students, staff, and faculty, and the disciplinary sanctions for violations of the standards of conduct.
  • The College offers an Employee Assistance Program (EAP), contracted through HelpNet, free and accessible to any employee who may be seeking confidential counseling, assessment and/or treatment options. The EAP is a benefit paid for by the College. Their hotline (800-969-6162) is accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Substance abuse needs are also covered by all medical plans offered by Mott Community College. Employees pay only their plan's deductible or co-pay for all treatment services.
  • Leaves of Absence. MCC offers leaves covered under the Family and Medical Leave Act. Employees may work with MCC’s Human Resources department to request a leave to participate in treatment, and the reason for the leave is maintained confidentially. Leaves may be full leaves, meaning the employee is entirely absent from work, or the employee may take intermittent leave of absence. Leaves are coordinated through and documented by the employee’s treatment provider.

MCC will impose sanctions on students and employees for violation of MCC’s policies and standards of conduct (consistent with federal, state, and local laws) up to and including reprimands, expulsion, termination, and referral for prosecution.

Students:

The Chair of the Student Code of Conduct at MCC or designee handles matters that require disciplinary action at Mott Community College. The concept of restorative justice and progressive discipline will be utilized in all cases, taking into consideration the severity of the incident, the number of times the student has been referred to the conduct system, etc. Discipline up to and including explosion may be implemented for policy violations.

Employees:

The Associate Vice President of Human Resources or designee handles matters that require disciplinary action at Mott Community College. The concept of progressive discipline will be utilized in most cases, taking into consideration the severity of the incident, prior disciplinary action, etc. Discipline up to and including discharge may be implemented for policy violations.

MCC Resources

Counseling Center
  • Location: Prahl College Center PCC2030
    Phone: (810) 762-0111
    Website:Personal Counseling
    Email: counsel@mcc.edu
    • Dean of Counseling
      Chris Engle, Ed.D – Dean of Enrollment, Retention and Registrar
      Phone: (810) 762-0242
      Email: chris.engle@mcc.edu

Public Safety
  • Location: Public Safety PS2002
    Phone: (810) 762-0222
    Website: publicsafety.mcc.edu
    • Theresa Stephens-Lock
      Executive Director/Chief
      Location: Public Safety PS2015
      Phone: (810) 762-0222
      Email: Theresa.Lock@mcc.edu
  • Health Services

    Location: Curtice-Mott Complex CM1146
    Website: healthservices.mcc.edu
    • Michael Becker
      Coordinator - Public Safety Health Services
      Phone: (810) 762-0541
      Email: michael.becker@mcc.edu

Human Resources
  • Location: Curtice-Mott Complex CM1117
    Phone: (810) 762-0565
    Website:hr.mcc.edu
    • Philip Espinosa
      Associate Vice President of Human Resources
      Phone: (810) 762-0566
      Email: philip.espinosa@mcc.edu

Community Resources

  • Adult Well-Being Services Substance Abuse
    16645 15 Mile Rd
    Clinton Township, MI 48035
    586-438-4108
  • Alcoholics Anonymous
    Helpline: 810-234-0815
  • Brighton Center for Recovery
    12851 Grand River Rd
    Brighton, MI 48116
    810-227-1211
    www.brightonrecovery.org
  • Catholic Charities
    Sheridan Center
    901 Chippewa Street
    Flint, Michigan 48503
    https://www.catholiccharitiesflint.org/
    Phone: 810-232-9950
  • Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
    Helpline: 800-662-4357
  • Flint Odyssey Outpatient Program
    1108 Lapeer Rd
    Flint MI 48502
    Phone: (810) 232-7919
    http://www.odysseyvillage.com/index.php
  • Genesee County Prevention Coalition (GCPC)
    902 East Sixth St.
    Flint, MI 48503
    Phone: 810-285-9047
    Email: info@theGCPC.org
  • Genesee Health System
    Substance Use Disorder Service
    420 W. Fifth Avenue
    Flint, MI 48503
    Phone: 810-247-3705
    Crisis: 877-346-3648
  • Narcotics Anonymous
    Helpline: 800-230-4085
    Odyssey Village
    Flint Odyssey House
    529 M.L. King Blvd.
    Flint, MI 48502
    Phone: (810) 238-5888
    http://www.odysseyvillage.com/index.php
  • Rethinking Drinking
    www.rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov
  • Sacred Hearts Rehabilitation Center
    2091 Professional Drive
    Ste. D
    Flint, MI 48532
    Phone: 810-732-1652
    https://www.sacredheartcenter.com/index.html

For a full list of local resources regarding substance abuse treatment centers, please visit Psychology Today - Substance Abuse Treatment Centers in Genesee County, MI

September 5, 2019
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